Articles on OJ Slaughter and Their Work

Date

'It’s A Love Letter': Photographer OJ Slaughter Puts History In The Hands Of Black Bostonians

Slaughter, who identifies as a black, nonbinary (Slaughter’s pronouns are they/them), Jewish and queer person, struggled to find a sense of belonging during a small-town New Jersey upbringing. Taking photos of local subjects became their way of sending “a love letter.”

Date

'Open Studio': The Intersection Of Art And Journalism by Jared Bowen For WGBH

On the latest Open Studio with Jared Bowen, local photographers OJ Slaughter and Philip Keith discuss their work documenting activism and social issues via a more intimate perspective than traditional journalists. Philip Keith is a Providence-based photographer whose work has been featured in publications such as Bloomberg, Businessweek, The Guardian, and Rolling Stone. Boston photographer OJ Slaughter has been taking portraits and fashion photos since 2011, but has now turned their attention to grassroots organizing and photographing activism.

Date

A Beautiful Resistance

In protest, there is community and joy rising
Headlines will have you believe that protest is violence and mutiny. Protest is many things. Love is at the foundation of most of them.

Date

A Boston Photographer's View Of The March On Washington

The temperature at this year’s March on Washington, on Aug. 28, soared to 93 degrees with maximum humidity. The heat pulled on me and stuck to my skin. I typically carry three cameras with ease, but that day they felt a hundred times more massive. On that late summer day, the drone of protesters’ voices couldn’t compete with the hum of crickets and cicadas in the trees lining the reflecting pool at the Lincoln Memorial.

Date

Backing art for justice
Committee on the Arts funding helps support a dozen activist creators

“The act of protest has so many different forms. … Do your part. No one should want to come out of this feeling like they could have done more.”
— OJ Slaughter

Date

Gordon Parks, “Showing America to Itself”

What the camera had to do was expose the evils of racism, the evils of poverty, the discrimination and the bigotry, by showing the people who suffered most under it.” These are the words of photojournalist Gordon Parks (1912-2006). From his work as a New Deal photographer in the 1940s, through the tumult of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and into the 70s, 80s and beyond, Parks’ images of Black America made visible the country’s racist legacy and the struggles to overcome it.

Date

Harvard Art Lab Visiting Resident

Visiting Artist

OJ Slaughter is a photographer, curator and community organizer based in Boston. OJ was the creative director of the ARTery 25- Millennials of color impacting Boston Arts and Culture organized by WBUR. During their summer studio at the ArtLab, OJ began a new project entitled The Modern Black History Project. This project seeks to understand better what sustains communities of color and the cultures they produce.

Date

History in the making: 10 photographers documenting the Black Lives Matter protests in the US

“I'd rather die telling history than not have stories told at all,” writes one photographer

Date

Photographers fear steep costs and little payment for covering protests By Annie Armstrong

A lack of protections for—and an increase in domestic dangers to—photojournalists is becoming increasingly visible amid the pandemic and political rallies

Date

Racism and public health: ICA Boston Discusses the role of the artist in 2020

In June, Mayor Marty Walsh declared racism a public health crisis as millions of Black Lives Matter protestors demanded justice for police brutality victims. The Institute of Contemporary Art Boston expands on this moment with a public virtual forum on October 29th.

Date

Seven Black Boston-Based Artists on Their Work as a Form of Protest

Photographer and creative director OJ Slaughter uses their camera to tell primarily Black and Brown stories, from dreamlike, colorful portraits to black-and-white protest photography.

  • Instagram